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IAMH2O’s core goals are sustainability & human capacity building. To achieve these goals we are developing the initiatives & programs below.

The End of Poverty? are used to illustrate the historic causes of developmental disparities between the world’s rich and poor nations. Once caught up to the present day, students explore a range of other forces that impact development, including international trade, international organizations, national and local governance, and the cultural imperatives that guide a society’s actions. Throughout the semester, lessons are reinforced through a variety of interactive activities, student presentations, and texts from noted personalities in the development field.


Following a look at the societal context in which development takes place, students begin to think critically about the development process, itself, and the role of the development worker within a community. They look at various approaches to development work and the steps necessary for successful project planning and implementation. Students are challenged to develop a community assessment survey that could be used to gather the information necessary to prepare a development plan for a community. The importance of including the community in the decision-making process is stressed continually throughout the semester, as is the concept of “appropriate technologies” to ensure that proposed solutions are within the means of the community to implement and maintain without forming a dependency on the development worker or organization and that through partnership with the development worker, communities become empowered to help themselves.


The second portion of the introductory course takes a marked turn toward specific fields of development. The first field students explore is water security, as water is among the most basic necessities of life and a foundation without which no other development project could be fully successful. Students are presented with global trends in water consumption and availability, as well issues of water pollution, water conflict, and water policy and privatization of water resources. Solutions for the provision of clean water are introduced on a variety of scales. Students learn about a range of methods for installing wells from hand-digging to the use of various drilling techniques. Proper well sitting and well-head protection are also addressed, as are the various means of pumping water from a well once it has been installed. Alternative sources such as spring-fed water delivery systems, surface water and rainwater harvest options are presented, along with methods for water purification when water is collected from such potentially contaminated sources.


Building upon the lessons in water security, the course proceeds to issues of hygiene and sanitation. Students participate in an interactive hygiene training seminar developed by Indianapolis-based Fountains of Hope. Students complete each activity as it would be completed by community members actually receiving the hygiene training. The seminar is designed to use interactive drawing, story-telling, and role playing, as well as an extensive pictorial curriculum to teach such topics as hand washing, food handling, water storage, rehydration techniques, and the identification of symptoms related to common water-borne illnesses. Students also learn about sanitation options ranging from simple pit latrines to full-scale sewer systems and wastewater treatment.


The next topic to be addressed is food security. Like water, proper nutrition is tantamount to successful development in all other spheres. Agriculture is introduced on a spectrum ranging from individual kitchen gardens to full-scale farming. Students learn about soils, and the necessary inputs where soils are not adequate to sustain agriculture, as well as considerations such as irrigation and pest control. Alternatives to modern chemical fertilizers and pesticides are also presented. In addition to raising crops, livestock options are discussed. Students explore common nutrient deficiencies and their symptoms, and recommend what additions must be made to a deficient diet to correct or prevent such problems.


Issues of solid waste and pollution are addressed not just from the perspective of treating that waste generated within the community, but also the growing trend of waste making its way from the developed world to developing nations and the associated environmental, social, and health impacts. Waste-to-energy options then provide the perfect segue into additional energy alternatives in developing communities. Students explore everything from the use of human-powered machines to leapfrog technologies that allow far-removed rural communities to bypass the traditional electric grid.


Each of these topics is very tangible, requiring the placement of structures and infrastructure within the community. Once these topics have been addressed, students will explore the concept of permaculture—the relative placement of all features within the community to maximize the efficiency of the community system. Students will think critically about the necessary inputs to each feature, as well as the byproducts each feature might produce to design a community where all physical needs are met and waste becomes a valuable resource.


Access to sufficient medical care is lacking in many parts of the developing world and further contributes to developmental struggles. Many easily treatable or preventable diseases have devastating effects on communities because medical care is inaccessible or nonexistent. The resulting loss of life and health has far-reaching social and economic implications for developing communities. Students will study these common disease and the methods available for treatment and prevention. They will also explore the social impacts of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and the unique challenges of working in communities impacted by them.


The unit on economic development will introduce students to a variety of financial models appropriate for a range of social settings, such as microfinance, rotating savings and credit associations, village banking, and more. Following the Grameen Bank model, the inclusion of social imperatives along with financial services will be addressed. Students will also explore the role of education in development from primary education through entrepreneurship and job training for adults with little formal education.


Finally, a variety of human rights issues are addressed, including gender equality, population and family planning concerns, human trafficking, property rights, and the effects of conflict. The methods by which these and other human rights issues are addressed in a community have a great effect on its development potential. Many of these are deep-rooted cultural issues that are not easily changed, so students will not only explore solutions to these difficult concerns, but also the different cultural perspectives that shape a community’s stance and how to work cooperatively within a cultural viewpoint that may differ greatly from their own.


To reinforce the concepts presented in the classroom, students are given a semester project to which they contribute regularly throughout the term. At the beginning of the semester, students are presented with a community case study. Case studies are selected to be representative of a wide range of development scenarios, such as urban and rural communities, pastoralist and nomadic societies, and seaside fishing communities. At least one location is assigned from each continent, as well, to provide a variety of contextual scenarios, such as landscape, weather patterns, governance, and cultural background. Students must research the community or region to gain familiarity with historical and current conditions, then create a development plan for the community which incorporates each of the topics addressed in the classroom. At the end of the semester, students present their unique development plans and can observe how their peers chose to address similar problems within differing contexts.


The course meets once a week for three hours, which facilitates the use of multimedia, as well as providing a substantial platform for guest speakers to share occasionally throughout the semester. Most importantly, there is a heavy focus on group discussion and interactive activities. The course is not marketed solely to engineering students, but to students from many of the university’s programs, particularly the School for Public and Environmental Affairs. It is through this interaction between students of diverse academic backgrounds that new and broader perspectives are fostered and the engineering curriculum surpasses the purely technical.

Global Solutions Design
Upon completion of the introductory course, students would have the option to continue their immersion in the Global Solutions program by participating in Global Solutions Design. This course further intensifies the practical application of the concepts taught in the introductory course by connecting students directly with a developing community to address a real felt need. Students will interact via email, video messaging, and community liaisons to learn about the cultural context, assets, and needs of the community. Students will work together with members of the community to determine its most urgent needs and develop a strategy to meet one or more of those needs. To empower the local community in taking ownership of the project, community members will be involved in the decision-making process throughout the semester. In this course, the balance between the social and technical will be fully realized as students practice designing a solution that is appropriate to the community partner.


Another unique aspect to the Global Solutions Design semester would be a focus on group building and preparation for intercultural travel. Students would participate in a variety of activities to help them identify the unique strengths they each bring to the group, as well as their individual thinking styles and methods of problem solving, decision making, and leadership. The group would work together to incorporate the variety of individual personalities into a functional development team. Similarly, the cultural dimensions of the partner community would be explored in depth to foster a cooperative approach to the intercultural work.


Ideally, two community partnerships would be established in one country: one in a rural setting and one urban community. Students will develop solutions for both, while the academic sessions would include a focus on the unique strategies for rural versus urban development. For each partnership, a representative of the community or local development organization will be identified as the primary point of contact. This representative will serve to maintain the connection between the community and the classroom and will disseminate information between the two parties as needed. This representative must have a deep understanding of the culture and needs of the community and a sufficient grasp of the English language to communicate those concepts to the students. The use of a community liaison does not preclude contact with other community members, but the representative will act as the facilitator and, if necessary, translator for any such communications. Course faculty will work closely with the community representatives to establish mutually convenient times for such communication to take place.


The type of solution developed for each community is not pre-determined, but will be decided together through communication between the community and the classroom. By continuing partnerships with the same communities year after year, a full-scale development program will be implemented to address needs in any of the development fields previously discussed.


Applied Global Solutions
In the third and final course of the Global Solutions curriculum, students will have the opportunity to implement the project developed during the Global Solutions Design semester. Through IUPUI’s Office of International Affairs, students will travel overseas and spend several weeks immersing themselves in the local culture while working side-by-side with community members to establish the solution devised together the semester before. Once in country, students would divide into two factions, one to visit the rural community and one to implement the urban project.


To ensure community ownership of the projects implemented during the trip, students will lead training sessions to educate community members on the proper implementation, use, and required maintenance of the projects. Community members will also be asked to work alongside the students in implementing the project to gain a deeper understanding of the structure or system that is being put in place and as a means of providing their own equity to the project. Where possible, community members may also be asked to supply a portion of the financial resources or materials necessary to complete the project.


During the trip, students will assimilate their new experiences through several academic activities. Students will be required to keep a journal documenting their experiences. Beyond a simple account of each day’s activities, the journals will be used to encourage critical thinking as students provide analysis of their experiences and explore ways to apply what they learn to their own lives and communities at home. Guided group discussions will be used to help students share their feelings and ideas and provide insights to one another periodically throughout the stay. Key among the group discussions will be those that take place following the stay, when the two groups meet to compare their unique experiences and upon re-entry when students will evaluate the experience as a whole and its impact on their own perspectives and future decisions.


Curriculum Resources
The curriculum for each of the Global Solutions courses is not currently supported by a single textbook, but rather incorporates a broad range of resources including books, scholarly articles, documentaries, and guest speakers.
Guest lecturers play an important role by highlighting their expertise and experience in particular development fields. Guest lecturers for Global Solutions for International Development include:

  • Juliana Fashanu is the founder and president of the IAMH2O Foundation, Inc., and was instrumental in establishing the affiliation with IUPUI from which the Global Solutions curriculum was born. IAMH2O is an Indianapolis-based development organization dedicated to serving communities through providing water resources, food security, energy, education opportunities, and health care. Juliana’s Nigerian heritage, experiences with the United Nations Development Programme and her service on the boards of multiple philanthropic organizations provide her with unique insight into development issues.
  • Michael Cline, PE, BCEE is the Vice President and Director of Engineering Operations for HWC. He has over 35 years of experience in the planning, design, and construction of water, wastewater, and storm water systems. Michael founded the Indianapolis Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders and currently serves as its president. He also mentors several EWB student chapters in Indiana.

В 

  • Brandon Pitcher is the founder and president of 5 Kingdoms Development, LLC which incorporates nature’s own design principles as in consultation for development projects in the US and abroad. Brandon has presented at over 300 speaking engagements and visited over 30 countries to research and implement the best practices in sustainable design.
  • Ji Hyeon Seo is a visiting research scholar from South Korea. She is a civil engineer at the Korea Environment Corporation and has been involved in many large-scale sewer and wastewater treatment operations. She is currently working with IUPUI’s Construction Engineering Management Technology program until October 2013.

В 

  • Sherri Bucher, PhD is the Assistant Professor of Research—Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the Indiana School of Medicine. She is also affiliated with the IU-Kenya AMPATH Program and Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research. She is a master trainer for Helping Babies Breathe(HBB), the US-based HBB representative to Kenya for the American Academy of Pediatrics, and an HBB partner for USAID. She has participated in HBB trainings in the US, South Africa, Ethiopia, and Kenya.

The reading and video materials used to support the classroom curriculum are listed in the Resources section below.
Conclusion
In an important effort to keep our collegiate curriculum current and in touch with global needs, this course attempts to cast a wide net and attract students from all disciplines and backgrounds. Once the group works together, the strengths of each individual will shine and expose these students to new ideas and careers.
One population segment that is often underrepresented in engineering is women. The number one reason why women do not pursue education and careers in engineering is the “lack of connection between engineering and the problems of our society (Mihelcic et al 2003). This curriculum directly addresses that concern, and is even co-taught by a female faculty member. In the second and third courses in this series, students have the opportunity to practice real-life scenarios and witness their impact first-hand.
This curriculum can be directly integrated into undergraduate coursework to fulfill elective requirements; furthering the potential impact of engineering education and careers. When introduced to these issues and ideas as a student, the potential for impact can be long standing and far reaching.

В 

For pictures of the Global Solutions Class, please click here.

IAMH2O’s core goals are sustainability & human capacity building. To achieve these goals we are developing the initiatives & programs below.

Global Solutions Curriculum for International Development @IUPUI
The goal of Global Solutions for International Development is to give students an overview of the issues facing developing communities worldwide and introduce them to ways they can make a difference. The course begins with a look at the historical context of development issues. Texts by Jared Diamond and Bryant Myers, along with the documentary The End of Poverty? are used to illustrate the historic causes of developmental disparities between the world’s rich and poor nations. Once caught up to the present day, students explore a range of other forces that impact development, including international trade, international organizations, national and local governance, and the cultural imperatives that guide a society’s actions. Throughout the semester, lessons are reinforced through a variety of interactive activities, student presentations, and texts from noted personalities in the development field.


Following a look at the societal context in which development takes place, students begin to think critically about the development process, itself, and the role of the development worker within a community. They look at various approaches to development work and the steps necessary for successful project planning and implementation. Students are challenged to develop a community assessment survey that could be used to gather the information necessary to prepare a development plan for a community. The importance of including the community in the decision-making process is stressed continually throughout the semester, as is the concept of “appropriate technologies” to ensure that proposed solutions are within the means of the community to implement and maintain without forming a dependency on the development worker or organization and that through partnership with the development worker, communities become empowered to help themselves.


The second portion of the introductory course takes a marked turn toward specific fields of development. The first field students explore is water security, as water is among the most basic necessities of life and a foundation without which no other development project could be fully successful. Students are presented with global trends in water consumption and availability, as well issues of water pollution, water conflict, and water policy and privatization of water resources. Solutions for the provision of clean water are introduced on a variety of scales. Students learn about a range of methods for installing wells from hand-digging to the use of various drilling techniques. Proper well sitting and well-head protection are also addressed, as are the various means of pumping water from a well once it has been installed. Alternative sources such as spring-fed water delivery systems, surface water and rainwater harvest options are presented, along with methods for water purification when water is collected from such potentially contaminated sources.


Building upon the lessons in water security, the course proceeds to issues of hygiene and sanitation. Students participate in an interactive hygiene training seminar developed by Indianapolis-based Fountains of Hope. Students complete each activity as it would be completed by community members actually receiving the hygiene training. The seminar is designed to use interactive drawing, story-telling, and role playing, as well as an extensive pictorial curriculum to teach such topics as hand washing, food handling, water storage, rehydration techniques, and the identification of symptoms related to common water-borne illnesses. Students also learn about sanitation options ranging from simple pit latrines to full-scale sewer systems and wastewater treatment.


The next topic to be addressed is food security. Like water, proper nutrition is tantamount to successful development in all other spheres. Agriculture is introduced on a spectrum ranging from individual kitchen gardens to full-scale farming. Students learn about soils, and the necessary inputs where soils are not adequate to sustain agriculture, as well as considerations such as irrigation and pest control. Alternatives to modern chemical fertilizers and pesticides are also presented. In addition to raising crops, livestock options are discussed. Students explore common nutrient deficiencies and their symptoms, and recommend what additions must be made to a deficient diet to correct or prevent such problems.


Issues of solid waste and pollution are addressed not just from the perspective of treating that waste generated within the community, but also the growing trend of waste making its way from the developed world to developing nations and the associated environmental, social, and health impacts. Waste-to-energy options then provide the perfect segue into additional energy alternatives in developing communities. Students explore everything from the use of human-powered machines to leapfrog technologies that allow far-removed rural communities to bypass the traditional electric grid.
Each of these topics is very tangible, requiring the placement of structures and infrastructure within the community. Once these topics have been addressed, students will explore the concept of permaculture—the relative placement of all features within the community to maximize the efficiency of the community system. Students will think critically about the necessary inputs to each feature, as well as the byproducts each feature might produce to design a community where all physical needs are met and waste becomes a valuable resource.


Access to sufficient medical care is lacking in many parts of the developing world and further contributes to developmental struggles. Many easily treatable or preventable diseases have devastating effects on communities because medical care is inaccessible or nonexistent. The resulting loss of life and health has far-reaching social and economic implications for developing communities. Students will study these common disease and the methods available for treatment and prevention. They will also explore the social impacts of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and the unique challenges of working in communities impacted by them.


The unit on economic development will introduce students to a variety of financial models appropriate for a range of social settings, such as microfinance, rotating savings and credit associations, village banking, and more. Following the Grameen Bank model, the inclusion of social imperatives along with financial services will be addressed. Students will also explore the role of education in development from primary education through entrepreneurship and job training for adults with little formal education.


Finally, a variety of human rights issues are addressed, including gender equality, population and family planning concerns, human trafficking, property rights, and the effects of conflict. The methods by which these and other human rights issues are addressed in a community have a great effect on its development potential. Many of these are deep-rooted cultural issues that are not easily changed, so students will not only explore solutions to these difficult concerns, but also the different cultural perspectives that shape a community’s stance and how to work cooperatively within a cultural viewpoint that may differ greatly from their own.


To reinforce the concepts presented in the classroom, students are given a semester project to which they contribute regularly throughout the term. At the beginning of the semester, students are presented with a community case study. Case studies are selected to be representative of a wide range of development scenarios, such as urban and rural communities, pastoralist and nomadic societies, and seaside fishing communities. At least one location is assigned from each continent, as well, to provide a variety of contextual scenarios, such as landscape, weather patterns, governance, and cultural background. Students must research the community or region to gain familiarity with historical and current conditions, then create a development plan for the community which incorporates each of the topics addressed in the classroom. At the end of the semester, students present their unique development plans and can observe how their peers chose to address similar problems within differing contexts.


The course meets once a week for three hours, which facilitates the use of multimedia, as well as providing a substantial platform for guest speakers to share occasionally throughout the semester. Most importantly, there is a heavy focus on group discussion and interactive activities. The course is not marketed solely to engineering students, but to students from many of the university’s programs, particularly the School for Public and Environmental Affairs. It is through this interaction between students of diverse academic backgrounds that new and broader perspectives are fostered and the engineering curriculum surpasses the purely technical.

Global Solutions Design
Upon completion of the introductory course, students would have the option to continue their immersion in the Global Solutions program by participating in Global Solutions Design. This course further intensifies the practical application of the concepts taught in the introductory course by connecting students directly with a developing community to address a real felt need. Students will interact via email, video messaging, and community liaisons to learn about the cultural context, assets, and needs of the community. Students will work together with members of the community to determine its most urgent needs and develop a strategy to meet one or more of those needs. To empower the local community in taking ownership of the project, community members will be involved in the decision-making process throughout the semester. In this course, the balance between the social and technical will be fully realized as students practice designing a solution that is appropriate to the community partner.


Another unique aspect to the Global Solutions Design semester would be a focus on group building and preparation for intercultural travel. Students would participate in a variety of activities to help them identify the unique strengths they each bring to the group, as well as their individual thinking styles and methods of problem solving, decision making, and leadership. The group would work together to incorporate the variety of individual personalities into a functional development team. Similarly, the cultural dimensions of the partner community would be explored in depth to foster a cooperative approach to the intercultural work.


Ideally, two community partnerships would be established in one country: one in a rural setting and one urban community. Students will develop solutions for both, while the academic sessions would include a focus on the unique strategies for rural versus urban development. For each partnership, a representative of the community or local development organization will be identified as the primary point of contact. This representative will serve to maintain the connection between the community and the classroom and will disseminate information between the two parties as needed. This representative must have a deep understanding of the culture and needs of the community and a sufficient grasp of the English language to communicate those concepts to the students. The use of a community liaison does not preclude contact with other community members, but the representative will act as the facilitator and, if necessary, translator for any such communications. Course faculty will work closely with the community representatives to establish mutually convenient times for such communication to take place.


The type of solution developed for each community is not pre-determined, but will be decided together through communication between the community and the classroom. By continuing partnerships with the same communities year after year, a full-scale development program will be implemented to address needs in any of the development fields previously discussed.


Applied Global Solutions
In the third and final course of the Global Solutions curriculum, students will have the opportunity to implement the project developed during the Global Solutions Design semester. Through IUPUI’s Office of International Affairs, students will travel overseas and spend several weeks immersing themselves in the local culture while working side-by-side with community members to establish the solution devised together the semester before. Once in country, students would divide into two factions, one to visit the rural community and one to implement the urban project.


To ensure community ownership of the projects implemented during the trip, students will lead training sessions to educate community members on the proper implementation, use, and required maintenance of the projects. Community members will also be asked to work alongside the students in implementing the project to gain a deeper understanding of the structure or system that is being put in place and as a means of providing their own equity to the project. Where possible, community members may also be asked to supply a portion of the financial resources or materials necessary to complete the project.


During the trip, students will assimilate their new experiences through several academic activities. Students will be required to keep a journal documenting their experiences. Beyond a simple account of each day’s activities, the journals will be used to encourage critical thinking as students provide analysis of their experiences and explore ways to apply what they learn to their own lives and communities at home. Guided group discussions will be used to help students share their feelings and ideas and provide insights to one another periodically throughout the stay. Key among the group discussions will be those that take place following the stay, when the two groups meet to compare their unique experiences and upon re-entry when students will evaluate the experience as a whole and its impact on their own perspectives and future decisions.


Curriculum Resources
The curriculum for each of the Global Solutions courses is not currently supported by a single textbook, but rather incorporates a broad range of resources including books, scholarly articles, documentaries, and guest speakers.
Guest lecturers play an important role by highlighting their expertise and experience in particular development fields. Guest lecturers for Global Solutions for International Development include:

  • Juliana Fashanu is the founder and president of the IAMH2O Foundation, Inc., and was instrumental in establishing the affiliation with IUPUI from which the Global Solutions curriculum was born. IAMH2O is an Indianapolis-based development organization dedicated to serving communities through providing water resources, food security, energy, education opportunities, and health care. Juliana’s Nigerian heritage, experiences with the United Nations Development Programme and her service on the boards of multiple philanthropic organizations provide her with unique insight into development issues.
  • Michael Cline, PE, BCEE is the Vice President and Director of Engineering Operations for HWC. He has over 35 years of experience in the planning, design, and construction of water, wastewater, and storm water systems. Michael founded the Indianapolis Professional Chapter of Engineers Without Borders and currently serves as its president. He also mentors several EWB student chapters in Indiana.

В 

  • Brandon Pitcher is the founder and president of 5 Kingdoms Development, LLC which incorporates nature’s own design principles as in consultation for development projects in the US and abroad. Brandon has presented at over 300 speaking engagements and visited over 30 countries to research and implement the best practices in sustainable design.
  • Ji Hyeon Seo is a visiting research scholar from South Korea. She is a civil engineer at the Korea Environment Corporation and has been involved in many large-scale sewer and wastewater treatment operations. She is currently working with IUPUI’s Construction Engineering Management Technology program until October 2013.

В 

  • Sherri Bucher, PhD is the Assistant Professor of Research—Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the Indiana School of Medicine. She is also affiliated with the IU-Kenya AMPATH Program and Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research. She is a master trainer for Helping Babies Breathe(HBB), the US-based HBB representative to Kenya for the American Academy of Pediatrics, and an HBB partner for USAID. She has participated in HBB trainings in the US, South Africa, Ethiopia, and Kenya.

The reading and video materials used to support the classroom curriculum are listed in the Resources section below.


Conclusion
In an important effort to keep our collegiate curriculum current and in touch with global needs, this course attempts to cast a wide net and attract students from all disciplines and backgrounds. Once the group works together, the strengths of each individual will shine and expose these students to new ideas and careers.
One population segment that is often underrepresented in engineering is women. The number one reason why women do not pursue education and careers in engineering is the “lack of connection between engineering and the problems of our society (Mihelcic et al 2003). This curriculum directly addresses that concern, and is even co-taught by a female faculty member. In the second and third courses in this series, students have the opportunity to practice real-life scenarios and witness their impact first-hand.


This curriculum can be directly integrated into undergraduate coursework to fulfill elective requirements; furthering the potential impact of engineering education and careers. When introduced to these issues and ideas as a student, the potential for impact can be long standing and far reaching.

IAMH2O is working with faculty at IUPUI to establish a collaborative initiative to address rural development issues. This consortium will be made up of various non-governmental agencies (NGOs) that address key areas of sustainable development such as water, food scarcity, energy, health, and education.
RSI will be working against the backdrop of the Water, Food, and Energy Nexus, researching and developing appropriate solutions for the advancement of rural communities.


The interdependence of water, food and energy will be the driving force behind these sustainable solutions.
The initiative hopes to draw in educators and experts to develop long-standing, replicable solutions and will be the guiding force behind IAMH2O’s on-the-ground development work.

It is necessary to approach sustainability issues as an interdependent function of the water, food, and energy nexus, rather than treating each of them as an isolated problem on its own.


Each factor influences each of the others, with water being the most vital to life. Water is the non-renewable element in this nexus and therefore requires a greater amount of attention.


In order to ensure successful, enduring rural development, the synergy between these elements has to be understood.
The Rural Sustainability Initiative (RSI), using this understanding as its foundation, will seek solutions through research and development, designing replicable models that can be customized to meet the advancement needs of individual at-risk communities.

The purpose of IAMH2O projects is to foster human capacity building and empowerment through the use of safe, clean water. Rather than “giving fish”

IAMH2O is committed to collaborative initiatives that foster training and education that create “fishermen”.

We seek to transform communities though sustainable water projects.

Although safe water, access to food and energy are a major part of our core objectives, IAMH2O also believes that better health and hygiene to include a focus on training and education will provide a deeper foundation for sustainable communities.

This is why IAMH2O limits the amount of project communities we serve in order to focus on the execution of our five phased development plan centered on water, food, energy, education (training) and health (The W.A.F.E.E.H model). Working with partners and experts on the ground and in the field we endeavor to train and implement projects in each of these categories for the advancement of emerging communities.

We recognize what clean water can do to change the lives of many throughout the world and are committed to not only greater access but moreover sustainability.

IAMH2O sees itself as a collaborative partner working with and for our respective communities. Our success is tied to every drop of clean, safe water we are able to provide to the vast majority of us that are dying for lack of access to and sustainability of clean water.

A partnership is defined as “the state or condition of being a collaborators; participants; associations; and or joint interest to a project, relationship or initiative.”
We at IAMH2O recognize partnership as the central driving force of our projects and the root of our successes. Because of this we do not dictate. We do not impose.


We listen, analyze, plan, train, and execute as one body led by our communities.


We cannot do this alone and therefore do not attempt to.


IAMH2O believes that it takes a village to break the cycles of poverty, thirst and hunger as well as to ensure sustainability, growth and advancement.
IAMH2O stands with and for those ready to work hard to stand for themselves.
We are a partner walking along side emerging communities.

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